Mortgage Broker in Park Circle, SC

We know that many home loan officers have horrible reputations. Some brokers only see their clients as transactions, and a means to make quick money. They come off as impatient and pushy, failing to understand that this is a very big decision for you. At Mission One Mortgage, we take the opposite approach. We encourage our clients to take as much time as needed to ask us questions and review mortgage documents. We could say that our mission is to exceed your expectations, but we'd rather just show you. From assistance finding FHA, VA, or other loans to refinancing your current mortgage, Mission One is the team you can trust.

Here are just a few reasons why home buyers choose Mission One Mortgage:

No Additional Fees

No Additional Fees- Providing our client's services free of charge, using a mortgage broker like Mission One Mortgage can help you scout the best price on loans without a hefty price tag.

Access to 50 Lenders

Access to 50 Lenders- With access to a range of loans and interest rates available, Mission One Mortgage can shop for the best loans for your unique needs.

Accessible to Our Clients

Accessible to Our Clients- Providing a transparent and communicative service to all our clients, Mission One Mortgage ensures all phone calls are answered or returned in a timely manner.

Setting You Up for Success

Setting You Up for Success- Helping you prepare all your documents for pre-approval and the loan application, Mission One Mortgage will provide you with all the necessary information to secure the best loan.

Contact Us For Service !

Free Consultation phone-number (843) 822-5685

To understand the benefits of working with a mortgage broker, you must first understand their role in the home-buying process.

What Does a Mortgage Broker Do?

Your mortgage broker is a third party that works to connect you with mortgage lenders. Essentially, a mortgage broker works as an intermediary between a person who wants to buy a home and the entities offering loans to buy a home. The mortgage broker works with both the borrower and lender to get the borrower approved. They also verify and collect paperwork from the borrower that the lender needs to finish a home purchase. Typically, mortgage brokers have relationships with several home loan lenders. Mission One Mortgage, for example, has access to 50 different lenders, which gives us a wide range of home loans in Park Circle, SC, from which to choose.

In addition to finding a home loan lender, your mortgage broker will help you settle on the best loan options and interest rates for your budget. Ideally, your mortgage broker will take a great deal of stress and legwork off your plate while also potentially saving you money.

Help with the Pre-Approval Process

If you're ready to buy a home, getting pre-qualified is a great choice that will streamline the entire process. Your mortgage broker makes getting pre-approved easy by obtaining all the documents needed to get you pre-qualified. In taking a look at your application, they will determine if you're ready for the pre-approval process. If your application needs additional items, the mortgage company will help point you in the right direction to ensure your application is as strong as it can be. Your mortgage broker will also walk you through the different types of loans, from Conventional and FHA to VA and USDA.

In order to be pre-approved for a home in South Carolina, you must have the following:

  • Two Years of W2 Forms
  • 30 Days of Pay Stubs from Employer
  • 60 Days of Bank Statements
  • A Valid Driver's License

Conventional Mortgages

Conventional loans can be used to purchase a new home or refinance your current one. Conventional loans include fixed-rate mortgages and adjustable-rate mortgages. Generally, borrowers must put down a 3% down payment for owner-occupants, 10% for a vacation property, and 20% for an investment home. If you are able to pay 20% of the total cost of the home, you can avoid private mortgage insurance, which is otherwise required. Conventional mortgages are often preferred by buyers with good credit or people needing a non-owner-occupied mortgage.

 Mortgage Broker Park Circle, SC
 Mortgage Company Park Circle, SC

FHA Loans

FHA mortgages are issued by the U.S. government and backed by the Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD). This loan is often preferred by first-time homebuyers because it only requires a 3.5% down payment and offers more flexibility with credit requirements and underwriting standards. FHA loans have several requirements you must meet to qualify. Contact Mission One Mortgage today to learn more about FHA loans and whether or not they're best for your financial situation.

USDA Loans

Also backed by the government, these loans are insured by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and don't require money down. These loans have lower insurance requirements when compared to FHA loans, offer 100% financing if you qualify, and allow for closing costs to be covered by the seller. In order to qualify for a USDA loan, you must live in a rural area, and your household income must meet certain standards. These loans are often preferred by low-income citizens who live in rural parts of South Carolina.

 Mortgage Lending Service Park Circle, SC
 Refinancing Park Circle, SC

Veteran Mortgages

Also known as VA or Veteran's Affairs loans, these mortgages are reserved for the brave men and women who served in the military. VA loans help provide our military members, veterans, and their families with favorable loan terms and an easy home ownership experience. Often, those who qualify are not required to make a down payment on their home. Additionally, these loans often include less expensive closing costs.

If you are a veteran or the family member of a veteran, contact Mission One Mortgage today to speak with our Vetted VA Professional, Debbie Haberny. Debbie helps our military members, veterans, and their family members obtain home loans utilizing veteran benefits and would be happy to help as you search for a home.

Q. I was talking to my spouse about mortgage brokers, and they mentioned the phrase home loan originator. What's the difference between a broker and a loan originator?

A. The mortgage industry is full of confusing jobs and titles, making it easy to confuse roles and responsibilities. Such is the case with mortgage brokers and home loan originators. Though their roles share similarities, a home loan originator in Park Circle, SC, works for a bank or credit union, while a mortgage broker works for a brokerage company. Home loan originators and mortgage brokers are both licensed by the Nationwide Multistate Licensing System (NMLS).

Q. I've heard from everyone that you must have mortgage insurance to buy a home. What is mortgage insurance?

A. Essentially, mortgage insurance helps protect lenders if a borrower forecloses on the home they bought. One advantage of mortgage insurance is that when borrowers pay it, lenders can often grant loans to buyers when they might not have otherwise. Though not always required to buy a home, mortgage insurance is often needed for down payments of less than 20%.

Q. I have just been pre-approved to buy a beautiful home in South Carolina. Is there anything I shouldn't do now that I'm pre-qualified?

A. Mortgage companies like Mission One Mortgage, make getting pre-qualified for a home easy. However, as your loan process continues, your lender is required to run a new credit report before closing on a home. For that reason, it's to avoid any activity that might affect your credit score, such as:

  • Do not become a co-signer on a loan with someone else.
  • Do not quit or change your job.
  • Do not apply for new credit cards, automobile loans, or any other lines of credit.
  • Do not use your credit card to pay for large purchases, like furniture for your new house.
  • Do not avoid payments on current lines of credit, loans, or utility bills.

Q. My brother-in-law recently refinanced his home in South Carolina. What is refinancing, and should I consider refinancing my home too?

A. Refinancing your home basically means you're swapping your current mortgage for a new one, most often with a lower interest rate. If you would like to reduce the term of your loan, lower your monthly mortgage payments, or consolidate debt, refinancing may be a smart option. Many homeowners also choose to refinance if they want to switch from adjustable-rate mortgages to fixed-rate mortgages or to get cash back for home renovations. To learn whether refinancing is a viable option for your situation, contact Mission One Mortgage ASAP, as loan rates change frequently.

Mission One Mortgage: Turning Dreams into Reality, One Mortgage at a Time

Head-bottom

Here at Mission One Mortgage, we believe that the best communities begin with the dream of home ownership. Our mission is to make those dreams come true, with personalized service, expert guidance, and good old-fashioned hard work. As one of the most trusted mortgage companies in Park Circle, SC, we have years of experience working with a diverse range of clients, from first-time buyers and investors to self-employed borrowers and non-native English speakers.

Though every mortgage situation is different, one thing never changes: our commitment to clients. Contact our office today to get started on an exceptional home-buying experience.

Contact Us For Service !

phone-number (843) 822-5685
 Refinances Park Circle, SC

Latest News in Park Circle, SC

North Charleston breaking ground on $20 million makeover of Park Circle

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Park Circle is officially getting a makeover.The City of North Charleston is breaking ground Wednesday on a $20 million redevelopment project in the center of the community. The work looks to transform the circle.Park Circle is officially getting a makeover. (WCIV)Previously, there used to be a community center, a butterfly garden, a green space and baseball field. But the community center was demolished just a few days ago, with the baseball field torn up as well.City officia...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Park Circle is officially getting a makeover.

The City of North Charleston is breaking ground Wednesday on a $20 million redevelopment project in the center of the community. The work looks to transform the circle.

Park Circle is officially getting a makeover. (WCIV)

Previously, there used to be a community center, a butterfly garden, a green space and baseball field. But the community center was demolished just a few days ago, with the baseball field torn up as well.

City officials say those amenities were outdated and didn’t fit the needs of their citizens today, which leaders hope will change with the completion of this project.

Improvements include a new cultural arts and recreation facility twice the size of the previous building, as well as an all-inclusive baseball field, a 55,000-square-foot accessible playground, and repaving of the walking path around the circle. The playground is expected to be one of the largest on the East Coast.

TJ Rostin, the city’s park and recreation manager, says he believes this will be the first facility of its kind in the Lowcountry and that it will help build a path for more like it in the future.

“This facility is going to be magnificent,” Rostin said. “When we open this, it's going to be one of the most state-of-the-art facilities this region in the Lowcountry has seen in quite some time [and will be something] everybody can have fun with. Just like I said, [the space will] really meet the needs of every citizen we have.”

The redevelopment is expected to take anywhere from 12-16 months, and Rostin says he hopes to welcome North Charleston residents to it by fall of 2023.

While this might be the biggest project to date for the city, it is certainly not the first project leaders have put together, as officials say they are making a commitment to bring more inclusive facilities to North Charleston.

The city just unveiled a new all-inclusive park in the Oak Terrace community in April. They also committed $26 million to improvements the Danny Jones Recreational Complex, which is expected to break ground by the end of the summer.

The new playground that will be built in Park Circle will also be a testing site for external research companies to analyze its impact in the community for future projects.

Park Circle is officially getting a makeover. (WCIV)

Rostin says these projects and resources put towards them will help citizens utilize the facilities more, which they hope will lead to more activity in the community.

“We’re starting with the Rec. Department facilities because we know those are the facilities that most people enjoy and use on a daily basis. We're really trying to reach out to every part of our community to make sure what we have and that we're here for them, they can utilize our facilities utilize our programs in any way that they need to,” Rostin added.

North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey said he would have started remodeling the Park Circle area sooner, but the city only received ownership of the land two years ago.

Funds for the project came from taxes and revenue bonds through the tax increment financing district in the city. Funding will also go towards improvements at the Danny Jones Recreational Complex.

The groundbreaking at Park Circle will happen at around 10 a.m. on Wednesday.

Third Park Circle Pride sees record-breaking numbers

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Park Circle Pride wrapped up Sunday after a week of different events in North Charleston celebrating members of the LGBTQ community.Last week was the third year of Park Circle Pride and event organizers say that this year had record-breaking numbers of people coming together to celebrate the LGBTQ community.From last Tuesday until Sunday, 45 events offered something for everyone ranging from drag shows and bike parades to raising of the Pride flag in park circle.Park Circle Pride Producer,...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Park Circle Pride wrapped up Sunday after a week of different events in North Charleston celebrating members of the LGBTQ community.

Last week was the third year of Park Circle Pride and event organizers say that this year had record-breaking numbers of people coming together to celebrate the LGBTQ community.

From last Tuesday until Sunday, 45 events offered something for everyone ranging from drag shows and bike parades to raising of the Pride flag in park circle.

Park Circle Pride Producer, Simon Cantlon, says this year was the largest turnout yet and he is excited to see the event grow in coming years.

“We had a record turnout and raised a lot of money for charity,” Cantlon says. “It’s just been a wonderful experience; like the community really did come together. Everyone opened their doors, and so many different people with so much diversity has come out to celebrate Pride here in Park Circle.”

Sunday during the Feminist Magic Market, people from all over the Lowcountry shopped at different local vendors stands and LGBTQ organizations were providing resources.

“It was a lot of fun,” Grace Waggoner, a Park Circle Pride attendee, says. “With my autism at first it was overwhelming, but then I got used to it. I’ve never been to a Pride so it was a lot of fun.”

For some younger LGBTQ community members, the week of events opened a new door of opportunity.

“It’s honestly kind of shocking, because in my old neighborhood, there was nothing for Pride Month,” SJ Austin, Park Circle Pride attendee, says. “But this is actively supportive, and it’s like this huge thing.”

As for the future of Park Circle Pride, Cantlon says raising money for charities is at the top of his list.

“I think the goal is to just keep growing it and bring in more people,” he says. “We get people coming from out of town, but I love more people to come in from out of town. I’d like to raise more money for the charities.”

He says that the dates for next year’s Park Circle Pride will be coming out shortly.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

How a neighborhood bar in Park Circle became Charleston’s comedy club

April 7, 2023Dusk comes and the house lights dim to a soft amber in a Park Circle bar that oozes organized chaos. No beach tones found here.Three party rockers wearing traditional Japanese attire take the stage abutting an overhead garage door covered in brand stickers and messages of bands who came before, serving as living art. The Kabuki masks come later.Funk in style, punk in presence, bands like the Otonana Trio used to be central to the experience of going to The Sparrow. Now a decade old, this neighborhood bar i...

April 7, 2023

Dusk comes and the house lights dim to a soft amber in a Park Circle bar that oozes organized chaos. No beach tones found here.

Three party rockers wearing traditional Japanese attire take the stage abutting an overhead garage door covered in brand stickers and messages of bands who came before, serving as living art. The Kabuki masks come later.

Funk in style, punk in presence, bands like the Otonana Trio used to be central to the experience of going to The Sparrow. Now a decade old, this neighborhood bar in Park Circle first known as a haven for everything punk rock and metal is working to position itself as the spot in Charleston for stand-up comedy.

That comedy works its way into the punk shows, like this one. The frontman-guitarist Kentaro Saito evokes a high school gym teacher trying to emcee an assembly, but with none of the audience’s reluctance. The crowd does the wave, flapping small white flags emblazoned with a red heart and the word “RAMEN” inside it in cadence to a song called “Peace (Say Peace MF).”

They serenade a crowd of around 20 people about life being awesome, loving beer and wars over who has the best ramen.

The night trickles on and brews flow in a place where a menagerie of characters and historical figures adorn the walls. Edgar Allen Poe observes from the corner of his eyes as the trio builds to the guitar solo in “Somebody to Buy Me a Beer.” Saito sheds his robes.

He stands in nothing but a traditional Japanese undergarment. He’s never stopped playing while undressing. Now half-naked, he turns around, shakes his buttocks at the crowd and shreds out a solo.

The song ends. Saito chugs his beer. The can moves from his lips, a waterfall splashes into his mouth and pours all over his head.

Who will buy him another, he asks, still standing in his underwear.

***

Going from punk bar to comedy club didn’t happen overnight.

Cami Kind, The Sparrow’s owner, laid the foundation when she started what’s now a nine-year-running open mic night. The rest came about with open mic regulars, such as show promoter and comedian Josh Bates, and a pandemic.

Now, Bates, with the approval of Kind, looks to put The Sparrow on the map as a must-go venue for working comedians. Kind picks and chooses her favorite artists for a handful of shows each year.

They’ve hosted more than 160 shows since the pivot in 2020, featuring rising stars like Natalie Cuomo, Dan LaMorte, Dave Hill, Sam Tallent and Liz Miele. Recently, film crews have even started recording stand-up specials there.

“I love the momentum we’ve built, and we’ve gotten some really big comics that I didn’t think we would have in this short amount of time that we’ve been doing it,” said Kind.

April 8, 2023

A slender brunette woman, her a body a canvas for tattoos, a nose ring and striking wing-tipped black eyeliner, stands before a sold-out crowd at The Sparrow, detailing the quandary of dating another comedian.

The full house across two shows is here for comedian couple Natalie Cuomo and Dan LaMorte, two rising performers in stand-up comedy who have hundreds of thousands of followers across social media. They tour together but perform separate sets with jokes often involving one another.

When the bizarre happens, it’s a fight over who gets to use life’s oddities in their set — in this case, the discovery of sex toys at a CVS pharmacy.

“Huge fight. Massive. We’re like, ‘Who the (expletive) gets to talk about this on stage?’ ” Cuomo says.

They play rock, paper, scissors for the right to tell the joke.

***

Cuomo and LaMorte, regulars of New York City’s comedy clubs, are the kind of comedians to show up at The Sparrow.

The early years for open mics featured duds and stops and starts. As time went on, people requested more and better; Kind obliged, with some help.

Bates is now five years into doing comedy full-time after two decades in community theater and 14 years in the U.S. Air Force. The COVID-19 pandemic forced a hiatus after just a couple of shows. But the global emergency gave them time to restructure.

“I don’t believe you should do something if you can’t do it to your best,” said Kind. “I went back to the drawing board, and this seems like it’s a lot more manageable.”

They went all in, starting with a show a month in late 2020. And shows started selling out.

“I think after COVID everyone wanted and needed to laugh,” she said.

Bates finds comedians, checks with Kind to clear the dates and makes sure there’s no competition in town that night. They try to plan around neighborhood events and comedy shows at places like Theatre 99 and the North Charleston Performing Arts Center, the latter snagging the biggest names in the business.

The Sparrow toes the middle ground.

“The area’s sort of a black hole for stand-up comedy, besides the PAC,” said Kind. “There’s nothing really in between.”

It’s in the small clubs where comedy can change perspectives, even if that comes with a learning curve for audience members who might be early in their exposure to the craft. Bates enforces the biggest rule: hecklers aren’t tolerated.

LaMorte said the work Kind and Bates have put in has paid off. A friend of his who worked shows and knew the region’s tour stops told the couple the venue was worth going out of the way.

If you’re catching our Best of SC Music 2023 edition, then you’ll see the records voted the top 20 out of South Carolina this past year.

But what about the albums we loved that missed the cut? Here, our writers share their picks that didn’t quite make it into the top 20 and why we think they still deserve some recognition.

Charleston Scene

Vincent Harris

Hirow, EL and Ivory Keys: “One Spliff And Three Minorities”

An EP came out in August that quickly established itself as one of the most interesting local releases from the 2023 Charleston music scene. A trio of hip-hop artists, Hirow, EL and Ivory Keys, collaborated on the EP, released under the title “One Spliff And Three Minorities,” which is also the name of the group. The EP immediately envelops the listener in its atmosphere with a dark and cinematic sound. Skeletal, low-tempo electronic beats anchor the songs’ moody twists and turns through movie-score string arrangements, muted bass lines and a generally haunted feel. The three MCs shadowbox each other throughout the song, dipping into their verses with lines like: “One too many shots I turn into Keith Urban” and “Stuck inside a house like I’m Macaulay Culkin,” which drift up out of the hazy, seductive feel of the music, turning the tired cliché of rap boasting into something funnier and more universal.

The Travelin’ Kine: “Ride”

The first two tracks on veteran Charleston sextet The Travelin’ Kine’s new album “Ride,” released in early September, will feel like home to longtime fans. These two tracks — “Again” and “Mean It This Time” — are right in the band’s wheelhouse. Singer and guitarist Slaton Glover’s rough-hewn vocals and heartfelt lyrics fit perfectly over the band’s deft mix of Americana roots music and country. The album’s producer, Josh Roberts, seems to be everywhere these days; he just finished producing and playing guitar on Columbia folk singer Danielle Howle’s new album “Current,” and he leads his own popular rock band, Josh Roberts & The Hinges. The sound Roberts and the band created on “Ride” definitely has a little more muscle than the 2016 debut album “Change In The Wind,” but these opening tracks sum up The Travelin’ Kine’s familiar easy-rolling sound.

Where to Eat and Drink in the Park Circle Neighborhood

Embracing its reputation as a trendy new neighborhood, Park Circle has welcomed the arrival of everything from coffee shops and bakeries to breweries and restaurants in the last several years—as well as a flock of new residents. Promising cheaper rent and a budding culinary scene, this up-and-coming North Charleston neighborhood lives up to its reputation. If you’re one of those newbies just settling into the neighborhood (or if you’re friends with one of the newcomers), here’s your handbook on where to eat and what t...

Embracing its reputation as a trendy new neighborhood, Park Circle has welcomed the arrival of everything from coffee shops and bakeries to breweries and restaurants in the last several years—as well as a flock of new residents. Promising cheaper rent and a budding culinary scene, this up-and-coming North Charleston neighborhood lives up to its reputation. If you’re one of those newbies just settling into the neighborhood (or if you’re friends with one of the newcomers), here’s your handbook on where to eat and what to order.

Eater maps are curated by editors and aim to reflect a diversity of neighborhoods, cuisines, and prices. Learn more about our editorial process.

What began as a food truck dishing out New Orleans-style food has grown into a full-sized restaurant along East Montague in Park Circle. While the dining room has expanded, the kitchen still operates out of the original food truck. Newbies should start with the shrimp risotto cake dipped in a Cajun cream sauce before digging into the seafood gumbo. And pair it all with the funky Firefly cocktail known as Swamp Water, a concoction of Firefly sweet tea vodka, orange, lemon, and lime.

One of Park Circle’s two wine bars, Stems & Skins is the result of a collaboration between former Husk sommelier Matt Tunstall and former Bull Street Gourmet owner Justin Croxall. Touting the slogan “Fresh and Funky Ferments,” they deliver on this promise. When stopping in for a glass here, try one of the bottles of pet-nat, a wine that utilizes an ancient method of natural fermententation for a sparkling treat. To complement the drinks, try the octopus and olive skewers and ricotta honey.

One of the few places in Charleston to get traditional Vietnamese food, Lotus provides an upscale dining experience with a unique menu. Start the meal off with the green curry mussels before ordering one of the large bowls of pho bo, a traditional beef pho with thinly sliced sirloin.

With devoted diners naming this eatery as one of the best pizza places in town, EVO offers a straightforward menu of pizzas, salads, and a handful of classic appetizers like pulled mozzarella and wood-fired olives. On your first visit to this popular neighborhood pizzeria, you need to experience a taste of the Pistachio Pesto pie or Pork Trifecta pizza. Better yet, bring a friend along and split both.

This burger joint tempts patrons with more than 40 topping options to be piled on the choice of chicken breast or beef, turkey, black bean, or elk patties. Meat eaters will definitely want to bite into the the lean, flavorful elk burger. Customize condiments to your heart’s content or opt for one of the signature burgers, like the fiery Diablo with sweet chili glazed, tequila pickled pineapple, hot sauce, and ghost pepper jack cheese.

The neighborhood’s only real breakfast joint, The Junction is an unassuming building on Spruill Ave. that usually garners a crowd of people waiting outside on the weekends. With reasonably priced mimosa carafes, sake bloody marys, and plenty of veggie options, this local watering hole never disappoints. The standout menu item? The daily hash bowl or the Mexican hash topped with cactus braised pork. And, make sure you add a maple-glazed doughnut as a side.

While the brewery offers a rotating menu of seasonal beers, the Hop Art has been a mainstay since Coast’s opening in 2007. For a taste of Park Circle, order a draft of this local IPA known for its heavy 7.7% alcohol content.

Patrons at the Codfather don’t have to do much thinking when it comes to ordering. This classic fish and chips shop opened by British-born Adam Randall offers just fried fish, as a fillet or butty — a British sandwich with chips, mushy peas, and chips. Go classic with the order and dig into the “World Famous Fish and Chips” with a side of curry sauce or gravy.

What began as a food truck dishing out New Orleans-style food has grown into a full-sized restaurant along East Montague in Park Circle. While the dining room has expanded, the kitchen still operates out of the original food truck. Newbies should start with the shrimp risotto cake dipped in a Cajun cream sauce before digging into the seafood gumbo. And pair it all with the funky Firefly cocktail known as Swamp Water, a concoction of Firefly sweet tea vodka, orange, lemon, and lime.

One of Park Circle’s two wine bars, Stems & Skins is the result of a collaboration between former Husk sommelier Matt Tunstall and former Bull Street Gourmet owner Justin Croxall. Touting the slogan “Fresh and Funky Ferments,” they deliver on this promise. When stopping in for a glass here, try one of the bottles of pet-nat, a wine that utilizes an ancient method of natural fermententation for a sparkling treat. To complement the drinks, try the octopus and olive skewers and ricotta honey.

One of the few places in Charleston to get traditional Vietnamese food, Lotus provides an upscale dining experience with a unique menu. Start the meal off with the green curry mussels before ordering one of the large bowls of pho bo, a traditional beef pho with thinly sliced sirloin.

With devoted diners naming this eatery as one of the best pizza places in town, EVO offers a straightforward menu of pizzas, salads, and a handful of classic appetizers like pulled mozzarella and wood-fired olives. On your first visit to this popular neighborhood pizzeria, you need to experience a taste of the Pistachio Pesto pie or Pork Trifecta pizza. Better yet, bring a friend along and split both.

This burger joint tempts patrons with more than 40 topping options to be piled on the choice of chicken breast or beef, turkey, black bean, or elk patties. Meat eaters will definitely want to bite into the the lean, flavorful elk burger. Customize condiments to your heart’s content or opt for one of the signature burgers, like the fiery Diablo with sweet chili glazed, tequila pickled pineapple, hot sauce, and ghost pepper jack cheese.

The neighborhood’s only real breakfast joint, The Junction is an unassuming building on Spruill Ave. that usually garners a crowd of people waiting outside on the weekends. With reasonably priced mimosa carafes, sake bloody marys, and plenty of veggie options, this local watering hole never disappoints. The standout menu item? The daily hash bowl or the Mexican hash topped with cactus braised pork. And, make sure you add a maple-glazed doughnut as a side.

While the brewery offers a rotating menu of seasonal beers, the Hop Art has been a mainstay since Coast’s opening in 2007. For a taste of Park Circle, order a draft of this local IPA known for its heavy 7.7% alcohol content.

Patrons at the Codfather don’t have to do much thinking when it comes to ordering. This classic fish and chips shop opened by British-born Adam Randall offers just fried fish, as a fillet or butty — a British sandwich with chips, mushy peas, and chips. Go classic with the order and dig into the “World Famous Fish and Chips” with a side of curry sauce or gravy.

Park Circle Gallery to exhibit works by Torreah “Cookie” Washington (SC) and Eunice Maku Ayiku-Nartey (Ghana)

The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to announce that a joint exhibition of art quilts by local artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington and Ghanaian artist Eunice Maku Aiyku-Nartey will be on display at Park Circle Gallery from September 1-30, 2021. A free reception will be held at the gallery on Friday, September 10, from 5:00-7:00pm. Cookie and Eunice will have a Zoom conversation about their works and artistic processes at 6pm. The public is invited to attend.Sisters Across the Sea...

The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to announce that a joint exhibition of art quilts by local artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington and Ghanaian artist Eunice Maku Aiyku-Nartey will be on display at Park Circle Gallery from September 1-30, 2021. A free reception will be held at the gallery on Friday, September 10, from 5:00-7:00pm. Cookie and Eunice will have a Zoom conversation about their works and artistic processes at 6pm. The public is invited to attend.

Sisters Across the Sea is an exhibition of fiber art celebrating the Motherline through dialogue between African American artist Torreah “Cookie” Washington and Ghanaian artist Eunice Maku Ayiku-Nartey. For the past 15 years Cookie has been curating the Annual African American Fiber Art Exhibition presented at North Charleston City Hall as a component of the North Charleston Arts Fest. This Park Circle Gallery exhibition was originally planned as a solo show of her work, but later became a collaborative effort when she extended an invitation to Eunice to debut her artworks in North Charleston. Introduced by a mutual friend, both artists create work that celebrates common themes of African history and heritage, celebrating community, and stories from their own lives.

Cookie and Eunice are creative kin sisters. Though they live on different continents, their artistic journeys are similar. Both women have been sewing since early childhood and are daughters of dress makers who encouraged them to obtain economic autonomy and joy through pursuit of their craft. Cookie launched her bridal design and soft accessories business, Phenomenal Women Designs, in 1991. Eunice established Eunimak Fashion in 1993. Each woman embeds their intricate textile works with spiritual, cultural, and historical transmissions.

Torreah “Cookie” Washington is an award-winning master art quilter and curator. A fourth-generation textile artist, she has been creating with textiles for more than a quarter of a century. Cookie was born in Rabat, Morocco, but has lived in the South Carolina Lowcountry for 30 years and has played an integral role in the local arts community. “I have a passionate urge to create art that is ‘way-showing,’” says Washington. “I seek to make art that challenges people, art that makes your spirit soar, makes you think and feel, or that agitates and annoys; art that challenges you to learn more about the subject and to find your own feelings about it.” Cookie’s wish is to keep the tradition of quilting brought to the Americas by enslaved Africans alive and, through her work, validate their culture by weaving stories of the African or African American experience into her quilts, just as her foremothers did almost four hundred years ago. Although she is working in a medium that is centuries old, she believes she and other art quilters are shifting the historical to accommodate their new application. “Art quilting, though an emerging fine art form, is a fairly small part of the art world. I am thrilled to be part of the sisterhood that is bringing this craft/art to the Lowcountry. I want the viewer to come away changed after having experienced my work. I am not at all interested in creating art that matches your furniture. I find that art quilting emits a spirit, a presence, an energy, a vitality unlike that of any other medium,” Cookie says. Learn more about Cookie and her work at cookiesewsquilts.com.

Eunice Maku Ayiku-Nartey, a Ghanaian dress designer and textile artist, has been passionate about sewing since childhood. Although she studied textile design and production at various institutions in the United Kingdom, her heart remained in Africa. After taking several entrepreneurship courses in Ghana, Eunice launched Eunimak Fashion at Adabraka, which has developed into an international brand through trade fairs and now makes custom made clothes for distinguished ladies and the American, Zimbabwean, and Canadian embassies. Eunice is also a member of the Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), which specializes in European and Afrocentric clothing, accessories, and soft furnishing in home décor. A commitment to sustainability is at the forefront of the fashion and fine art that Eunice creates. The natural world and Ghanaian culture are generative sources of inspiration for her textile art, which is often created using repurposed scrap fabrics. The vibrant colors in woven kente cloth from the Ashanti and Volta regions of Ghana, as well as the rhythmic traditional dances like Adowa and Agbadza, are recent muses appearing in her textile creations. In describing her artistic journey, Eunice shares “my art was created along my journey of life and my sincerest gratitude goes to my late mom and dad.” View Eunice’s work on Instagram at @eunimak_fashion.

Park Circle Gallery is located at 4820 Jenkins Avenue in North Charleston, in what was formerly known as the Olde Village Community Building. Admission is free and free street parking is available on Jenkins Avenue in front of the gallery, as well as on the adjacent streets and in parking lots close by. The gallery is open 10:00am-6:00pm Wednesday-Friday, and Noon-4:00pm on Saturday. Staff and all visitors must wear a face covering while they are in the gallery. Hand sanitizer will be provided upon entry. For more information about PCG, call 843-637-3565 or email culturalarts@northcharleston.org. For information on other Cultural Arts programs and artist opportunities, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.